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Dog owners have lower risk of death, according to new study in Scientific Journal

IF YOU own a dog then you are likely to live longer, a new study has found, with some breeds especially good at ensuring your longevity.

Mathew Murphy

Dog owners have lower risk of death, according to new study in Scientific Journal

IF YOU own a dog then you are likely to live longer, a new study has found, with some breeds especially good at ensuring your longevity.

by Mathew Murphy

News Corp Australia Network
November 19, 20171:46am

Owning a dog can help you live longer, new research has found.

YOU want to live longer? Get a dog.

That’s the finding from a new Swedish study published on Friday in the journal Scientific Reports which states that dog ownership is associated with a reduced risk for cardiovascular disease and death.

You are likely to see more birthdays if you own a dog.

You are likely to see more birthdays if you own a dog.

The results were most robust in single people: For these individuals, dog ownership was linked to a 33 per cent reduced risk of mortality from any cause (it was 11 per cent for multiple-person households), compared to non-owners.

Heart attack-related death was reduced by 36 per cent for single people, compared to 15 per cent for non-single.

The research didn’t look at whether more dogs equals additional longevity.

The research didn’t look at whether more dogs equals additional longevity.

The odds of having a heart attack at all were 11 per cent lower in single dog owners.

“A very interesting finding in our study was that dog ownership was especially prominent as a protective factor in persons living alone,” said study author Tove Fall, “which is a group reported previously to be at higher risk of cardiovascular disease and death than those living in a multi-person household. Perhaps a dog may stand in as an important family member in the single households.”

Owners of hunting dogs like terriers were most protected from cardiovascular disease and death.

Owners of hunting dogs like terriers were most protected from cardiovascular disease and death.

People who live alone have been shown previously to be at a higher risk of cardiovascular death.

The study looked at over 3.4 million Swedish individuals between the ages of 40 and 80.

Some of the benefits may be due to the increased exercise and social interaction a person gets from walking a dog.

If you want to live longer then you should get a dog.

If you want to live longer then you should get a dog.

“We know that dog owners in general have a higher level of physical activity, which could be one explanation to the observed results. Other explanations include an increased wellbeing and social contacts,” Ms Fall said.

Studies have previously shown owning a dog can help reduce health issues like asthma.

Studies have previously shown owning a dog can help reduce health issues like asthma.

People who live with dog also get some extra exposure to microbes.

Previous studies have found reduced risk of certain health issues, like asthma and allergies, in kids who grow up with a dog.

Owners of hunting breeds, including terriers, retrievers, and scent hounds, were most protected from cardiovascular disease and death.

Dog owners may also live longer because they tend to get out more and exercise.

Dog owners may also live longer because they tend to get out more and exercise.

 

What about the way your dog behaves towards you?

There is plenty of evidence that primates adopt facial expressions when they are in front of an audience.

HAVE you ever wondered whether your pooch is trying to tell you something by giving you puppy dog eyes?

Well, scientists believe that our canine friends really are attempting to communicate using that pout or those irresistible pleading eyes, The Sun reports.

Researchers found that dogs raise their eyebrows when they are looked at, a mechanism which makes their eyes appear bigger.

But the clever clogs canines won’t do the same when handed food — suggesting their brow waggling is more than just excitement and could be an attempt to tell us something.

there has been little research into how our pets might be manipulating us using their eyes and facial movements. Experts at the University of Portsmouth found that dogs produced significantly more facial movements when being watched than not.

They increased the frequency of certain expressions as a way of communicating.

Source – News.com.au

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